Bruno Bini muss gehen – Philippe Bergeroo neuer Nationaltrainer

Von am 30. Juli 2013 – 14.22 Uhr 32 Kommentare

Bruno Bini ist nicht mehr Trainer der französischen Frauenfußball-Nationalelf, der nach der EM in Schweden auslaufende Vertrag wurde nicht verlängert. Der französische Fußballverband (FFF) zog damit die Konsequenzen aus dem frühen Viertelfinal-Aus gegen Dänemark und ernannte Philippe Bergeroo als seinen Nachfolger.

Dies gab FFF-Präsident Noël Le Graët heute im Anschluss an eine Sitzung des FFF-Exekutivkomitees bekannt. Le Graët erklärte: „Wir haben großen Respekt vor Bruno, einem sehr sympathischen und professionellen Trainer, der die Mannschaft mit seinen menschlichen Qualitäten so geführt hat, wie man es im Fußball heute nicht oft sieht. Er hat das Team jedes Jahr verbessert, aber jetzt ist die Zeit für einen Wechsel gekommen.“

Zweimal Vierter bei WM und Olympia
Bini hatte die Französinnen von 2007 bis 2013 betreut und hatte mit seinem Team sowohl bei der Frauenfußball-WM 2011 in Deutschland wie auch beim Olympischen Frauenfußball-Turnier 2012 in London den vierten Platz belegt. Bei der EM in Schweden war er mit seiner Elf überraschend schon im Viertelfinale gegen Dänemark ausgeschieden.

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Bruno Bini

Bruno Bini muss nach dem Viertelfinal-Aus bei der EM seinen Platz räumen © Nora Kruse, ff-archiv.de

Ex-Torwart Bergeroo wird Nachfolger
Der ehemalige Nationaltorhüter Bergeroo, der zwischen 1979 und 1984 drei Länderspiele für Frankreich bestritt, betreute zuletzt die männlichen U19-Junioren Frankreichs, zuvor war er für diverse weitere Junioren-Auswahlen verantwortlich. Die französische Frauen-Nationalelf ist Bergeroos erste Station im Frauenfußball.

Auftakt zur WM-Quali in Kasachstan
Frankreich startet am 25. September in Astana in Gruppe 7 auswärts gegen Kasachstan die Qualifikation zur Frauenfußball-WM 2015 in Kanada.

Schlagwörter: ,

Markus Juchem (50) schreibt seit 2003 über Frauenfußball, für Medien wie Womensoccer.de, UEFA.com, FIFA.com, DFB.de, FAZ, NZZ und Kicker.

32 Kommentare »

  • noworever sagt:

    @wrack:
    „So kommt man immer zu denselben “Hinweisen”, die natürlich konform mit dem eigenen dichotomen Denkmuster sind.“

    … with or without ‚dichotomy‘ … EVERYthing is a projection of my own.
    it’s simply the way of things.

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  • wrack sagt:

    @ noworever: „EVERYthing is a projection of my own.“

    Mag ja sein, ist aber doch egal, denn wir alle handeln doch so, als wären diese Projektionen Realität 🙂

    (0)
  • Therese sagt:

    @Bernd Zeller

    Bernd Zeller schrieb:
    Was die Effizienz in der Offensive angeht, ist die bei den Französinnen durchaus vorhanden…

    Therese antwortet:

    EM2009
    Niederlande – Frankreich 0-0 Frankreich verliert das Elfmeterschiessen, keine Effizienz in der Offensive

    Freundschaftspiel in Juni 2013 (bereits eine kleine Warnung!)
    Frankreich – Australien 0-2, keine Effizienz in der Offensive

    EM2013
    Daenemark – Frankreich 1-1 Frankreich verliert das Elfmeterschiessen, keine Effizienz in der Offensive

    Bernd Zeller schrieb:
    … wenn mal nicht gewonnen wird, hat das meist andere und keine sportlichen Gründe

    Therese antwortet:
    … wenn mal nicht gewonnen wird, hat das AUCH meist andere
    und NICHT NUR sportlichen Gruende!
    (meine Antwort @Laasee)

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  • Therese sagt:

    @Laasee

    Laasee wrote:
    It is interesting to look at each Nation and compare with EURO 2009.
    France – Worse. Better results in 2013 but attitude and arrogance was their big problem.

    Therese answers:
    I have copied two comments which imho points out exactly what
    went wrong with Bruno Bini France WNT:
    link: https://www.bigsoccer.com/community/threads/binis-babes.1973907/page-32

    #782
    French players always fight with all theit heart. They do have character. But it’s far from being enough. After all, when Sonia – the strongest fighter of all, no doubt – was there, France lost in the same way against Holland in 2009, Sweden in 2011, Japan and Canada in 2012, or Lyon against Wolfsburg this year in C1’s Final. It’s not enough….
    In order to win in difficult and exceptional circimstances (international tournament’s knock-outs), you have to learn to lose in daily life. Something that none of Lyon’s players (between 2/3 to 3/4 of the NT) has ever experimented for the last three years (not a single defeat until this year C1’s Final). As soon as they are tied or even lead with only a short margin (1 goal), they are lost and panic. It’s so unnatural for them ! But even Denmark is above Issy or even above PSG, Juvisy or Montpellier. Soubeyrand was absolutely right when she said that Lyon’s over domination in D1 was not a good thing for French WF and particularly for the NT. Lyon’s supporters enraged and understood the words as a pure insult to their club and players, instead of thinking about what it actually meant. There is nothing against Lyon, as a club, there is nothing against its wins and trophies (they must be congratulate for them) , it’s just a fact that can be openly shown and seen today, as it was already last year at the Olympics. Yes, this over-domination is objectively a bad thing for the NT… Germany is a constant top nation with its NT through the years because its players fight hard in their various teams all year long in their league. They all know what it is to be tied or led with 20 minutes to go only. How many times we saw that with Potsdam or Wolfsburg this season, winning in the last minutes ? Lyon never did. To have (or to have not) this habit is as important as to practice shoots at the goal, FK, CK, etc. And, apparently, much more.
    Getting rid of Bini is a first step, yes. Essential, yes. But it won’t be enough. Getting rid of an over-domination of a single team is absolutely essential, even if it’s – maybe for foreign observers only – the unseen part of the iceberg the NT Titanic breaks against.
    Next season, things „should“ improve, since PSG, Juvisy, MHSC, Guingamp, ASSE are all making efforts. We’ll see if it will give fast results. I have some doubts.

    #783
    I agree completely that Lyon which was a big part of the rise must also take credit for a reason the team has plateaued. U saw it in the Montpellier game, a team who unless Delie just goes crazy has no business forcing PKs with Lyon. U saw it in the CL final. The German and Swedish leagues r not balanced top to bottom either. Instead they offer three or four competitive teams each year and the winner changes from year to year. Lyon has no competition. The battle in D1 is for the second spot. Worse, even if u discount most of Lyon’s games r too easy, they have too many good players to play them all. Look at Le Sommer. Other than the US (who has strikers out the petute), she starts for any other WNT in the world, yet at Lyon, she comes on as a sub in many games. How is that good for her development? Rapinoe plays part time and Ohno doesnt play at all so why r they even there? A lot of this goes beyond a new coach for the NT. The FFF has to seriously look at whether they want to win CL or want to win a WWC.

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  • Therese sagt:

    Zur Kompletierung
    #784

    Your last sentence „The FFF has to seriously look at whether they want to win CL or want to win a WWC.“ is really interesting. Historically, the first man who changed WF in France, in the modern era, and opened the door to what it is today, was Louis Nicollin, Montpellier’s President. He was the first to really believe in WF’s future within a men’s professional team. His aim was just to develop the discipline in the best way… Then, came Jean-Michel Aulas, Lyon’s president. His ambition was not only to develop women’s football, but also and above all to win the CL. It has always been a personal (and legitimate, of course) obsession for him. First of all, of course, with the men’s team. He never could play even a Final, in spite of a 7 years reign over national French football (2002-2008). Then, he put all his hopes into the Women’s team. For that, he merged his team with the FC Lyon in 2004, another local team who had been Women’s Football Champion four times (91, 93, 95, 98). I’d rather say that more than a merge, OL „swallowed“ FC Lyon. Then, Aulas’s goal was simple : doing with the girls what he was doing with the boys : dominate the national league and conquer Europe. Aulas is a great President, no doubt,, even if his personality and behaviour can be – and are – highly contested. But he always put the priority to his teams more than to the NTs. And, because of the long reigns of his teams at the national level, he developped a very, very strong personal power in French but also European football world. He’s extremely political and clever. So, the FFF never went against Aulas’s will in anything, even if the relations were very difficult most of the time… Aulas always claimed that he was buying all the best French players (men or women – he litterally „killed“ Montpellier by buying in two years Abily, Bompastor, Nécib, Thomis, Lattaf) in order to reinforce French football. But, actually, if he reinforced his team – no doubt with the results we know as far as the Women’s team is concerned – he impoverished the level of the league. And FFF let it do as he wanted, because he was too powerful. So, you see the importance of your sentence. Yes, that’s the question : what does the FFF really want to achieve in the close future ?

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  • noworever sagt:

    @wrack

    genau! 🙂

    (0)
  • enthusio sagt:

    @Therese:
    Danke für diesen interessanten Link ! Sehr interessant, wie die französischen Fans die Umstände des Ausscheidens ihrer Mannschaft kommentieren.

    (0)
  • Jennifer sagt:

    @Therese: Thank you for this interesting link. It’s a really enjoyable read compared to some of the unsubstantiated accusations we can sometimes find here in this forum. Very interesting how the French fans view their team and the French history of women’s football.

    (0)
  • Therese sagt:

    Ohne Worte!:

    (0)
  • Therese sagt:

    @Enthusio & Jennifer

    Gern gemacht!

    Noch etwas mehr ueber Frankreich, Division 1, PSG und Farid Benstiti

    link: https://www.bigsoccer.com/community/threads/french-division-1.1974428/page-48 (inklusiv youtube interview
    in franzoesisch)

    #1183

    A very interesting (as usual, actually) interview of Farid Benstiti, for those who understand French.

    For the others, and to summarize his words :

    – He didn’t find the Euro was of a very high level. The best organized teams (Germany, Norway, Denmark) were present the end, and it was normal. The last four (those + Sweden) + France were the best teams. He was not surprised by England’s result.

    He strongly criticizes some D1’s coaches (probably Lair mainly, even if he didn’t quote his name) who spent their time in the media criticizing heavily Bini, instead of showing a solidarity.

    – He is satisfied with PSG’s last season, even if there is still this big regret of the Cup SF lost against Saint-Etienne, but he knows that it taught a lesson to the players, already obvious at the next game (decisively won against Juvisy).

    – The recruitement so far is exactly what he wanted, and even better since he found that the two young U19 Léa Declercq and Ghoutia Karchouni can be fully used during the season. For him, they proved they can be starters, when he previoulsy saw them rather in the reserve.

    – His main goal is to bother Lyon in its domination, trying to come closer to it and even, if possible, win the title.

    – He really things that PSG can win the CL this coming season. For a possible triple (championship, Cup, CL), why not, but it’s extremey difficult and depends on many things, including a bit of luck.

    – The Qatari owners are expecting from him a new qualification for CL and one title (any). Benstiti says that this year will be hard to qualify again, because Juvisy who recruited cleverly with Brétigny and Deville, will still be there.

    #1182
    A – apparently serious – rumor sends the excellent Brazilian international player ERIKA to PSG. It is said in Brazil that she could sign in the next days. Of course, it has to be confirmed…

    That would be a real fantastic move, both for PSG and for D1. 25 years old, Erika is a real star. She is currently playing for Centro Olimpico, and played formerly for Santos. She also played in USA (FC Gold Pride). She is a tall (173 cm) either defender (CD or RB) or defensive midfielder (her best position, imho). She scored one of the most beautiful goals of the 2011 WC against Equatorial Guinea. See it in this video (she wears #13 and the goal’s action begins about 50 seconds after the start of the video)

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  • Therese sagt:

    In 2003 gewann Frankreich U19 mit Bruno Bini zum ersten Mal
    die EMU19. Zehn Jahre spater blickt http://www.footofeminin.fr zurueck
    was in zehn Jahren mit den Spielerinnen passiert ist.

    link (in franzoesisch): https://www.footofeminin.fr/Retro-Que-sont-devenues-les-Championnes-d-Europe-U19-de-2003_a7331.html

    (0)
  • Zaunreiter sagt:

    @Therese:

    Vielen Dank für den Cartoon mit der Barriere! 😉

    Jetzt im nachhinein finde ich ihn witzig, wie da der gemeine Franzose und die gemeine Französin mit der Nase an die Wand prallen, während die Jungspunde beiderlei Geschlechts unten drunter durchspazieren. Wobei: Die männliche U 19 hat ja leider ihr Finale gegen Serbien verloren.

    Was PSG angeht. Ich halte Erika für überbewertet. Außerdem hab ich immer noch ihre Unfairness des WM-Viertelfinales im Kopf.

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